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  • Marbles

    $7.50
    This was a common game for children of the 1860’s.The object of the game is to knock as many marbles as you can out of a designated area. Begin by drawing a circle (approximately 3 feet in diameter) in the dirt or with chalk on a hard flat surface. Next throw the 10 small marbles into the circle. Cradle the large marble in your index finger and tuck your thumb behind the marble. Keeping your finger outside the circle lay your hand on the ground and flick the marble out of your hand with your thumb. When a marble is knocked out of the circle it is won by the shooter. The shooter with the most marbles wins. /!\ WARNING: CHOKING HAZARD-This toy is a small ball. Not for children under 3 yrs.
  • Tinder Box with a handle. The top is a lid that can be removed to store a candle, striker and flint. (Candle, striker and flint not included) 2-3/4"
  • Tops

    $8.00
    Tops are among the oldest and simplest of toys. The earliest tops were hand-made from wood and objects in nature. Later, they were mass-produced on lathes and in factories. Colonial children, who frequently made their own toys, could make them easily out of scrap wood from their father’s workshops.
  • This detailed Map of Louisiana depicts the Civil War battle sites fought within the state. On the back side you can learn about the sites in detail and find out more information about Louisiana's part in the Civil War. Map shipped in mailing tube.
  • Handsomely crafted 16 oz. stein with the logo of Confederate Memorial Hall.
  • This book contains a history of Confederate Memorial Hall from its opening in 1891 to the present. It contains many early photo's of the building, and pictures of the Museum's vast collection of Civil War artifacts.
  • The tools of war of the blue and gray: infantry, cavalry, artillery and the navy; a profusely illustrated guide to their equipment, clothing, organization, and weapons. Over 500 illustrations.
  • This is the story of how the myriad of treasures from the War Between the States found its way to Memorial Hall in the late 19th and early 20th century. Watch an insider's view of the Battle Abbey of the South, a monument to its founders and a repository of cherished tales and memorabilia from our nation's most defining conflict. Includes a booklet history of Memorial Hall from its early days through today. Order Standard DVD Edition, Cost is 15.00 for each, plus 4.00 Shipping and Handling.
  • This is the story of how the myriad of treasures from the War Between the States found its way to Memorial Hall in the late 19th and early 20th century. Watch an insider's view of the Battle Abbey of the South, a monument to its founders and a repository of cherished tales and memorabilia from our nation's most defining conflict. Includes a booklet history of Memorial Hall from its early days through today. Order Blue Ray DVD Edition, Cost is 15.00 for each, plus 4.00 Shipping and Handling.
  • Dice

    $17.50
    Another civil war era game, the game "Farkle" was play with a horn cup and six dice. This set will come with instruction to play "Farkle" The horn cup is made from horn resin.
  • Early in the Civil War, Louisiana’s Confederate government sanctioned a militia unit of black troops, the Louisiana Native Guards. Intended as a response to demands from members of New Orleans’ substantial free black population that they be permitted to participate in the defense of their state, the unit was used by Confederate authorities for public display and propaganda purposes but was not allowed to fight. After the fall of New Orleans, General Benjamin F. Butler brought the Native Guards into Federal military service and increased their numbers with runaway slaves. He intended to use the troops for guard duty and heavy labor. His successor, Nathaniel P. Banks, did not trust the black Native Guard officers, and as he replaced them with white commanders, the mistreatment and misuse of the black troops steadily increased. The first large-scale deployment of the Native Guards occurred in May, 1863, during the Union siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana, when two of their regiments were ordered to storm an impregnable hilltop position. Though the soldiers fought valiantly, the charge was driven back with extensive losses. The white officers and the northern press praised their tenacity and fighting ability, but the Native Guards were still not accepted on the same terms as their white counterparts.
  • A reproduction of a pre-civil war era reading aid, this Magnifier is approx 5 1/2" long with a 2" diameter magnifier. The letter opener is approx 6 1/4".